Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

11-7-2018
TSM Business School (TSM) has facilitated a restart of WakaWaka after bankruptcy. TSM takes over the brand name and the remaining stocks of the producer of efficient lamps and telephone chargers on solar energy. TSM will use its expertise in business administration and leadership development to make WakaWaka future-proof. Albert-Jan Postma, director / owner of the Freia Group, of which TSM is a part, comments on the restart: "WakaWaka is an innovative company with sustainable and socially relevant principles that has come into financial problems due to managerial challenges. For the TSM training program, WakaWaka is a wonderful and special case. Sustainably furthering WakaWaka perfectly fits in the TSM training program." Albert-Jan Postma founded AOG Holding 25 years ago as a joint venture with the University of Groningen (RUG). He developed AOG into a successful public/private partnership within the Freia Group, the network of training and training companies of which he is the owner.   Freia includes TSM Business School, AOG School of Management and Comenius Courses (all three 50% RUG), IBO Qualified Business School, NIVE Training, Horizon Training & Development and Van Harte & Lingsma. SPJ supports Freia Group in communications.
20-3-2018
  Ten Cate Advanced Composites (TCAC) is being sold to Toray in Japan for € 930 million. It’s good news for the current shareholders. But less so for the Netherlands. Because it means another high-potential company is falling into foreign hands after a brief interlude under Dutch control.   A consortium of Gilde, Parcom and ABN Amro Participaties acquired parent company Royal Ten Cate, including TCAC, in early 2016 for € 714 million and delisted it. The swift sale of the division for a considerably higher price confirms the view of the former shareholders who pointed to an undervaluation of Ten Cate’s future value at the time of the acquisition bid in 2016. The rapid sale furthermore demonstrates that promises about keeping companies together in the event of a sale are taken with a pinch of salt even if they’re made by Dutch investors.   Royal Ten Cate was for many years a sterling example of Dutch enterprise. Under the leadership of CEO Loek de Vries, the company developed from a struggling textiles producer into a highly promising producer of composites for aviation, protective fabrics, geotextiles and synthetic turf. The company based in Almelo, the Netherlands competed at a world-class level. Who could have imagined this when De Vries took over the helm in 2000? But the lack of cohesion, factory underutilisation and perhaps De Vries’ unconventional personality placed pressure on the stock market valuation and made the company vulnerable to an acquisition.   It was agreed at the time of the sale in 2016 that the company would remain intact for at least three years. Now, two years later, the first crown jewel is already being sold. CEO Jan Albers announced in January of this year that the company was looking for a strategic partner to achieve the required scale. 'We’re now examining the strategic options. It is premature to say we are looking exclusively at a sale because that would limit the strategic options from the outset.'   The fact that the sale has gone ahead anyway is perhaps indicative of the Netherlands. Or to use football metaphors: The Champions League seemed within Ten Cate’s reach, but it got stuck in the Jupiler League, which has become known in recent weeks as the Jupiter League. It’s a competition in which talented players can develop their skills. Talents are spotted by scouts who have contacts with agents who sell them to the big clubs. They’re first sold to clubs in the Netherlands, but are then transferred to international clubs as quickly as possible.   Talent used to be given the time to develop; now they leave for international clubs at an increasingly young age. That is, after all, where the big money is. The consequence is that football talent is more and more concentrated among a small group of leading clubs. But most of these talents end up sitting on the bench at these clubs. They’re paid big salaries, but their development stalls, which in turns makes the competition boring.   Representatives of private equity firms made it clear at a recent private equity summit in Amsterdam that they are aware of their role. Sustainability, diversity and social responsibility are crucially important to them. The question is whether contributing to a sustainably successful Dutch business community also plays a role in this regard. Talent development calls for a long-term vision. There are plenty of examples of how private equity firms have positively contributed to this development. But the role played by the three Ten Cate shareholders is not yet one of them.  
20-3-2018
Ten Cate Advanced Composites (TCAC) wordt voor € 930 miljoen verkocht aan Toray in Japan. Goed nieuws voor de huidige aandeelhouders. Minder goed nieuws voor Nederland. Opnieuw komt een veelbelovend bedrijf na een korte tussenstop in buitenlandse handen.     Gilde, Parcom en ABN Amro participaties haalden het moederbedrijf Royal Ten Cate, inclusief TCAC,  begin 2016 voor € 714 miljoen van de beurs. De snelle verkoop van het onderdeel tegen een aanzienlijk hogere prijs bevestigt het gelijk van de toenmalige aandeelhouders, die bij het overnamebod in 2016 spraken van een onderwaardering van de toekomstige waarde van Ten Cate.   De snelle verkoop geeft ook aan dat beloftes over het bij elkaar houden van bedrijven bij verkoop, zelfs als ze worden gedaan door Nederlandse investeerders, met een korreltje zout genomen moeten worden.    Lang gold Koninklijke Ten Cate als een parel van Nederlands ondernemerschap. Het bedrijf ontwikkelde zich onder CEO Loek de Vries van een noodlijdende textielfabrikant tot een veelbelovende producent van composieten voor luchtvaart, beveiligingsmaterialen, geotextiel en kunstgras. Nederland deed vanuit Almelo mee op wereldniveau.   Wie had dat gedacht toen De Vries in 2000 het roer overnam. Toch drukten gebrek aan samenhang, onderbezetting in fabrieken en wellicht het eigenzinnige karakter van De Vries de beurswaardering en werd het bedrijf kwetsbaar voor een overname.      Bij verkoop in 2016 werd afgesproken dat het bedrijf in elk geval drie jaar intact zou blijven. Nu, twee jaar later, is het eerste kroonjuweel al in de verkoop gegaan. In januari van dit jaar kondigde CEO  Jan Albers nog aan dat werd gezocht naar een strategische partner om te juiste schaalgrootte te bereiken. 'We onderzoeken nu de strategische opties. Het is nog te vroeg om te zeggen dat we uitsluitend kijken naar verkoop, want dan zou je de strategische opties op voorhand beperken.'   Dat de uitverkoop toch is begonnen, is wellicht tekenend voor Nederland. Om in voetbalmetaforen te spreken: Voor Ten Cate leek de Champions League haalbaar, maar het strandde in de Jupiler League, de laatste weken beter bekend als de Jupiter League. Het is een competitie waar talent zich kan ontwikkelen. Talent dat wordt gespot door scouts die contacten hebben met makelaars die talenten verkopen aan de grote clubs. Eerst in Nederland, maar dan zo snel mogelijk naar het buitenland.   Vroeger kreeg talent de tijd zich te ontwikkelen, nu vertrekken ze steeds jonger naar het buitenland. Daar is het grote geld immers beschikbaar. Het gevolg is dat het talent zich in het voetbal steeds meer concentreert bij een kleine  groep toonaangevende clubs. Het meeste talent zit daar overigens op de bank. Tegen een mooi salaris, maar de ontwikkeling stokt en het maakt de competitie saai.   Op een onlangs gehouden private equity summit in Amsterdam toonden vertegenwoordigers van de private equity-huizen zich bewust van hun rol. Duurzaamheid, diversiteit en maatschappelijke verantwoordelijkheid zijn voor hun van wezenlijk belang. De vraag is of het leveren van een bijdrage aan een duurzaam succesvol Nederlands bedrijfsleven daar ook een rol bij speelt. Talentontwikkeling vraagt een lange termijn visie. Er zijn genoeg voorbeelden te geven van een positieve bijdrage van private equity aan die ontwikkeling. De rol die de drie aandeelhouders van Ten Cate spelen hoort daar vooralsnog niet bij.      
21-2-2018
The majority of Eneco’s shareholders wants to shed the shares but management is resisting a sale. As emotions ran high, the Supervisory Board refused to get involved. Thanks to a mediator, the parties are now speaking with each other again, but the question remains how things came to this and what lessons need to be learned.   Eneco’s shares are held by municipalities, with Rotterdam and The Hague as majority shareholders. The unbundling in which Eneco split off the network company changed the company’s risk profile in a competitive market. Shareholders are obviously aware of this as well. So they started asking themselves whether the position of a municipality as shareholder continues to be justified and sensible.   Questions asked during a protracted period of consultation included the following: is being a shareholder important to safeguarding municipalities’ energy interests? (do we need this for energy supply), is it important in financial terms? (what is preferable: a lump sum or annual dividend) and how much say do shareholders have from a legal perspective? (do you have any influence, as a shareholder, on the company’s policies).   Weighing these interests is a democratic process in which each municipal executive reached a decision in consultation with the municipal council. Based on weighing up local interests, as that is the basis of voters’ mandate. In the end, municipalities representing 74.55% of the capital decided to sell their interests, while 24.77% stated they wanted to hold on to their shares (for the time being). Whether that will remain so after the municipal elections in March remains to be seen.   The sale (or flotation) of Eneco itself is a next step. But that led to a conflict: while Eneco reproached the shareholders for wishing to cash in on their interest only for the highest possible price, Eneco’s stance, those shareholders claimed, was too demanding by setting conditions relating to employment and sustainability. The shareholders also complained that the Supervisory Board supposedly did not sufficiently take account of their interests.   Eneco’s management wants to be in control of its own future. There’s nothing wrong with that in itself, but the emotions this has unleashed do give pause for thought. This has every appearance of a coordinated campaign. On social media, the municipal executives opting to sell are being branded moneygrubbers, profiteers, greedy and much worse.   A rainbow coalition of political parties and environmental groups is propagating a hard-line stance via the website www.enecoblijftvanons.nl. And professor of transition management and sustainability Jan Rotmans never misses an opportunity to loudly condemn the municipalities’ decision to sell.   But the question is why emotions are running this high. After all, municipalities surely cannot be expected to remain shareholders ad infinitum of a commercial enterprise that is no longer directly connected with their inhabitants’ energy supply. The more so as the dividend is uncertain in a competitive market and shareholders’ influence is limited.   Eneco’s green future does not in fact depend on the municipalities. A strong partner can offer extra scope for green investments and agreements can be reached on sustainability as part of the sale. A buyer who is not looking for this can best turn elsewhere. That much is clear.   But whichever buyer may step up, an international company, institutional investors or private equity investors, they will not allow themselves to be bawled out as severely as the municipalities have been in recent months. This is a learning opportunity that needs to be grasped by the management and Supervisory Board members. Communication with shareholders must be improved. Eneco’s management is green in this area as well. As green as grass.
21-2-2018
De meerderheid van de aandeelhouders van Eneco wil van de aandelen af, maar het management verzet zich tegen verkoop. Terwijl de emoties opliepen, hield de raad van commissarissen zich afzijdig. Dankzij een mediator wordt er weer gesproken, maar de vraag blijft hoe het zover heeft kunnen komen en wat de lessen zijn.   De aandelen van Eneco zijn in handen van gemeenten, met Rotterdam en Den Haag als grootaandeel­­houders. De splitsing waarbij Eneco afscheid nam van het netwerkbedrijf heeft het risicoprofiel van de onderneming in een competitieve markt veranderd. Dat zien aandeelhouders ook. Dus zijn ze zich gaan afvragen of de positie van een gemeente als aandeelhouder nog gerechtvaardigd en verstandig is.    In een lange consultatieperiode werden vragen gesteld als: is het aandeelhouderschap van belang voor het borgen van energiebelangen van gemeenten?  (hebben we het nodig voor de energievoorziening), is het financieel van belang? (wat heeft de voorkeur: een bedrag ineens of ieder jaar dividend) en wat is de juridische zeggenschap van aandeelhouders? (heb je als aandeelhouder invloed op het beleid van de onderneming).   Het afwegen van deze belangen is een democratisch proces waarin ieder college in overleg met de gemeenteraad tot een besluit is gekomen. Op basis van afweging van lokale belangen, want dat is de basis van het mandaat van de kiezer. Uiteindelijk besloten gemeenten die 74,55% van het kapitaal vertegenwoordigen hun belang te verkopen, en 24,77% gaf aan hun aandelen (nog) te willen houden. Of dat zo blijft na de gemeenteraadsverkiezingen in maart zal nog moeten blijken.      De verkoop (of beursgang) van Eneco zelf is een volgende stap. Maar dat leidde tot een conflict: waar Eneco de aandeelhouders verweet dat ze alleen voor de hoogste prijs hun belang willen verzilveren, zou Eneco volgens die aandeelhouders te veeleisend zijn door voorwaarden te stellen op het gebied van werkgelegenheid en duurzaamheid. Ook voelden de aandeelhouders zich achtergesteld omdat de raad van commissarissen te weinig oog voor hun belangen zou hebben.   De top van Eneco wil controle over de eigen toekomst. Daar is op zich niets mis mee, maar de emoties die dit losmaakt geven te denken. Het heeft alles weg van een gecoördineerde campagne. Op sociale media worden colleges die hebben besloten tot  verkoop afgeschilderd als geldwolven, zakkenvullers, graaiers en nog veel meer.     Via de website www.enecoblijftvanons.nl  gaat  een regenboogcoalitie van politieke partijen en milieugroepen er met gestrekt been in. En hoogleraar transitiekunde en duurzaamheid Jan Rotmans laat ook geen gelegenheid onbenut om het besluit tot verkoop door de gemeenten luidruchtig te veroordelen.     De vraag is waarom de emoties zo hoog oplopen. Van gemeenten kan immers niet worden verwacht dat ze tot in lengte van jaren aandeelhouder blijven in een commercieel bedrijf dat geen directe binding meer heeft met de energievoorziening voor hun inwoners. Het dividend is bovendien ongewis in een competitieve markt, en de invloed van aandeelhouders is beperkt.   De groene toekomst van Eneco hangt ook niet van de gemeenten af. Een sterke partner kan extra groene investeringsruimte bieden en bij de verkoop kunnen afspraken over duurzaamheid worden gemaakt. Een koper die daar niet op uit is, kan zijn heil beter elders zoeken. Dat is wel duidelijk.   Maar welke koper er ook komt; een internationale onderneming, institutionele beleggers of private equity-investeerders, ze zullen zich niet zo hardhandig de oren laten wassen als de gemeenten de afgelopen maanden is gebeurd. Voor bestuurders en commissarissen is dit een leermoment. De communicatie met aandeelhouders moet beter. Ook op dat gebied is het bestuur van Eneco groen. Groen als gras. 
31-10-2017
A boardroom full of smart directors and supervisory directors is no guarantee for smart decisions. The importance of communications is an underestimated and scarcely researched factor in this process. Board members run on routine and automatisms and often do not speak frankly. This can lead to costly mistakes.   Researcher Marilieke Engbers gave a glimpse into the research she is conducting for her doctoral dissertation in an article in the August 2017 edition of the MCA (Management Accounting & Control) trade journal. Her research focuses on the decision-making process in the boardroom. Engbers is the Programme Director of the new ‘Board Dynamics, leadership and communication’ executive programme at VU University Amsterdam.   She has been struck by the fact that research into boardroom decision-making has so far been focused primarily on tangible aspects such as governance, the composition of the board and the role of the chair. This is striking because, in her opinion, the quality of the decision-making is largely determined by the board members’ dynamics, behaviour and intercommunications. Engbers says this remains a black box for researchers.   The researcher notes that strategic and complex decisions must be made in the boardroom by a relatively large group of people. There is little time for an extensive exchange of information. The relationships among the board members also play a key role. Speakers decide themselves at the last second what they do or do not say. They also attune their remarks to the context in which they are operating.   Communicating in a group requires the willingness to take risks. You can place yourself or someone else in a vulnerable position by sharing information. The estimated risk is connected with the people on the team and the balance of power among the members (who has the formal and who has the informal power). This estimation can in turn be based on assumptions or speculations.   If supervisory directors do not have a shared vision of the objectives they are aiming to achieve, different supervisory directors may pursue different objectives. As a result there is insufficient time to examine each topic in depth and to tap into the existing diversity of knowledge and experience.   It is remarkable that the role of communications in decision-making processes has been paid so little attention. This is probably due in part to the fact that communications are wrongly associated with large groups and mass media. Communications are also often only deployed at the end of the decision-making process, so once the decision has already been made. This is odd considering that the effects of a decision depend to a large extent on the acceptance by stakeholders. Communications are crucial for the successful implementation of a decision.   One reason why communications are applied at such a late stage could be that the professionals in the field increasingly focus on the execution process rather than the content. Change processes are currently being completed at an ever-faster pace and are increasingly managed by super specialists. This is causing the gap between content and process in communications to become wider and wider.   This leads to tension in the communications and comes at the expense of the support for changes among internal and external stakeholders. The task of communications is to close that gap by focussing more on the content than the process and claiming a role at an earlier stage in the decision-making process. Also in the boardroom.
31-10-2017
Een kamer vol slimme bestuurders en commissarissen is geen garantie voor slimme beslissingen.  Het belang van communicatie is een onderschatte en nauwelijks onderzochte factor in dit proces. Bestuurders drijven op routine en automatismen, en laten vaak niet het achterste van hun tong zien. Dat kan leiden tot kostbare vergissingen.   In een artikel in het vakblad MCA (Management accounting & control) van augustus 2017 licht onderzoekster Marilieke Engbers een tipje van de sluier op van het promotieonderzoek dat zij verricht. Dat onderzoek richt zich op het besluitvormingsproces in de bestuurskamer. Engbers is programmadirecteur van het nieuwe executive programma ’Board Dynamics, leadership and communication’ aan de VU in Amsterdam.   Het is haar opgevallen dat onderzoek naar besluitvorming in bestuurskamers zich tot nu toe vooral heeft gericht op tastbare aspecten als governance, de samenstelling van het bestuur en de rol van de voorzitter. Dit terwijl de kwaliteit van besluitvorming naar haar mening in hoge mate wordt bepaald door de dynamiek, het gedrag en de onderlinge communicatie van bestuursleden. Volgens Engbers is dit voor de wetenschap nog een black box.   Volgens de onderzoekster moeten er in de bestuurskamer met relatief veel mensen strategische en complexe besluiten worden genomen. Voor een uitgebreide uitwisseling van informatie is weinig tijd. Ook speelt de onderlinge relatie een belangrijke rol. Sprekers bepalen zelf pas op het laatste moment wat ze wel en niet zeggen. Bovendien stemmen ze wat ze zeggen af op de context waarin ze opereren.     Communiceren in een groep vergt de bereidheid om risico te nemen. Door informatie te delen kan je een ander of jezelf in een kwetsbare positie brengen. Het ingeschatte risico hangt samen met de personen in het team en met de onderlinge machtsverhoudingen (wie heeft de formele en wie heeft de informele macht). Die inschatting kan weer gebaseerd zijn op aannames of speculaties.   Als commissarissen door gebrek aan tijd geen gezamenlijk beeld hebben van de doelen die zij nastreven, kan het zijn dat verschillende commissarissen verschillende doelen nastreven. Daarmee wordt de tijd per onderwerp te kort om er echt diep op in te gaan en de aanwezige diversiteit aan kennis en ervaring te benutten.   Het is opmerkelijk dat de rol van communicatie in besluitvormingsprocessen zo onderbelicht is gebleven. Deels is dit wellicht het gevolg van het feit dat communicatie ten onrechte gekoppeld wordt aan grote groepen en massamedia. Daarnaast wordt communicatie vaak pas ingezet aan het eind van de besluitvorming, dus als het besluit  al is genomen. Dit terwijl de effecten van een besluit in belangrijke mate afhangen van de acceptatie door stakeholders. Communicatie is cruciaal voor het succesvol doorvoeren van een besluit.      Een oorzaak van het zo laat inzetten van communicatie zou kunnen zijn dat de vakmensen in het veld zich in toenemende mate richten op het proces van de uitvoering, en zich minder richten op de inhoud. Nu veranderingsprocessen zich steeds sneller voltrekken, en steeds vaker gestuurd worden door superspecialisten, wordt de kloof tussen inhoud en proces in communicatie steeds groter.   Dit leidt tot spanning in de communicatie en gaat ten koste van het draagvlak voor veranderingen bij stakeholders, in en buiten de organisatie. Het is de taak van communicatie om die kloof te dichten door meer op de inhoud dan op het proces te sturen en een plek eerder in het besluitvormingsproces te eisen. Ook binnen de bestuurskamer. 
20-6-2017
International investors have voiced their concerns about the Dutch proposal that would impose a legally sanctioned one-year time-out period in the case of unwanted acquisitions. The investors’ concerns appear to be justified. The cure seems to be worse than the ailment for an open economy like the Netherlands.   In a letter to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, Dutch Minister of Economic Affairs Henk Kamp put forward several options for giving the boards of Dutch companies more time in the event of unwanted acquisition attempts. Examples include making it easier to introduce protective measures, raising the minimum percentage for fulfilment of a bid, including a minimum consideration period in the Dutch Public Bids Decree and introducing a legally sanctioned one-year time-out period for company boards.   The Dutch government also wants to conduct an analysis of sectors that provide a critical service (drinking water, chemicals, nuclear, payments, aviation, shipping handling, defence and politics). It is furthermore examining the reciprocity of laws in non-EU countries (including the US and China). This is because what is allowed in the Netherlands isn’t always allowed in other countries.   The proposal for a one-year time-out has particularly caused a stir. In a letter to Minister Kamp, the International Corporate Governance Network (ICGN), supported by 13 international institutional investors, called it an ‘unduly harsh provision that damages shareholder protections to the detriment of good corporate governance, efficient markets and sustainable value creation.’   The proposed measures have been prompted by the attempted acquisitions of Unilever by Kraft Heinz and of AkzoNobel by PPG. The debate on this topic had, however, already been sparked by Bpost’s attempt to acquire PostNL. A salient detail is that none of these companies operate in one of the critical service sectors the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs are now going to examine.   What’s more, AkzoNobel has an excellent arsenal of protective devices at its disposal and has essentially been taken under the protection of the Enterprise Section of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal. The majority of the shares in AkzoNobel are held by foreign investors and the company scarcely plays a role in Dutch society. Paint is not a vital product and the AkzoNobel head office provides only limited employment. AkzoNobel did, however, sell Organon to MSD, which subsequently moved most of the relevant R&D activities out of the Netherlands.   The resistance against the proposed acquisition of PostNL by Bpost last year was remarkable too. A well-developed postal company from a friendly neighbouring country that wants to acquire a moribund and floundering postal company and provide all kinds of guarantees. It seemed like a great deal, but it wasn’t allowed.   The proposed measures create a danger that international investors will take a more reluctant view towards investments in the Netherlands. While this could be compensated by Dutch institutional investors making more investments in the Netherlands, they already distanced themselves from the country years ago. This isn’t likely to change any time soon given the growing threat of a higher Dutch discount. As a result it is becoming significantly more difficult and more expensive for Dutch companies to raise capital.   In order to promote high-quality employment in the Netherlands, it would be wiser for Kamp to spend the rest of his time as Minister of Economic Affairs on matters such as abolishing the bonus ceiling for banks. More high-quality employment could be gained by attracting banks leaving London than by implementing artificial protection for underperforming companies.
20-6-2017
Internationale beleggers hebben hun zorgen uitgesproken over het Nederlandse wetsvoorstel dat voorziet in een juridische timeout van een jaar bij ongewenste overnames. De zorgen van de beleggers lijken oprecht. Voor een open economie als de Nederlandse lijkt het effect van het middel erger dan de kwaal.   In een brief aan de Tweede Kamer heeft de Minister van Economische Zaken Henk Kamp een aantal opties voorgelegd om besturen van Nederlandse ondernemingen meer tijd te geven bij ongewenste overnames. Gedacht wordt aan het eenvoudiger maken van invoering van beschermingsmaatregelen, het verhogen van het minimum percentage voor gestanddoening van het bod, het invoeren van een minimumbedenktijd in het Besluit openbare biedingen en een wettelijke bedenktijd voor bestuurders van een jaar.    Daarnaast wil het kabinet een analyse doen naar sectoren met een vitaal proces (drinkwater, chemie, nucleair, betalingsverkeer, vlucht- en vliegtuigafdeling, scheepvaartafwikkeling, defensie en politie). En er wordt gekeken naar de reciprociteit van regelgeving in landen buiten de EU (o.a. de VS en China), want wat hier kan is daar niet altijd mogelijk.   Vooral het voorstel voor een mogelijke bedenktijd van een jaar heeft nogal wat stof doen opwaaien. In een brief aan Kamp spreekt het International Corporate Governance Network (ICGN), gesteund door 13 internationale institutionele beleggers , van een “veel te strenge maatregel die de aandeelhoudersbescherming beschadigt,  ten koste van goede corporate governance, effiënte markten en duurzaame waardecreatie.”   Aanleiding voor de maatregel waren de pogingen tot overnames van Unilever door Kraft Heinz en van AkzoNobel door PPG. Maar eerder was de discussie al aangewakkerd door de inspanningen van BPost om PostNL over te nemen. Sailliant detail is dat geen van deze bedrijven behoort tot de sectoren met een vitaal proces waar het ministerie nu naar gaat kijken.   AkzoNobel beschikt bovendien over een goed arsenaal aan beschermingsmogelijkheden en is effectief in bescherming genomen door de Ondernemingskamer. Het bedrijf is voor de overgrote meerderheid in handen van buitenlandse beleggers en speelt nauwelijks een rol in de Nederlandse samenleving. Verf is geen vitaal product en het hoofdkantoor van AkzoNobel biedt maar beperkte werkgelegenheid. Wel verkocht AkzoNobel ooit Organon aan MSD, dat relevante R&D activiteiten vervolgens grotendeels weghaalde uit Nederland.   Merkwaardig was eerder al de weerstand tegen de voorgenomen overname van PostNL door BPost. Een goed ontwikkeld postbedrijf uit een bevriend buurland dat uit strategische overwegingen een zieltogend en afkalvend postbedrijf wil overnemen met allerlei garanties. Het lijkt een prachtig aanbod, maar het mocht niet.   Het gevaar van de maatregelen is dat internationale beleggers zich terughoudender zullen gaan opstellen ten opzichte van beleggingen in Nederland. Dat kan gecompenseerd worden door meer investeringen van Nederlandse institutionele beleggers  in Nederland, maar die hebben al jaren geleden afstand genomen tot de Nederlandse markt. En met een groeiend risico van een hogere Dutch discount door de nieuwe regelgeving, wordt beleggen in Nederland er niet aantrekkelijker op. Een belangrijk gevolg hiervan is dat het aantrekken van kapitaal door Nederlandse ondernemingen aanzienlijk moeilijker en zeker duurder wordt.   Om hoogwaardige werkgelegenheid te stimuleren doet minster Kampt er waarschijnlijk verstandiger aan zijn resterende tijd als minister te besteden aan het afschaffen of verhogen van het bonusplafond voor banken. Met het binnenhalen van banken die London willen verlaten is waarschijnlijk meer te winnen dan met kunstmatige bescherming van matig presterende ondernemingen.      
01-6-2017
The management of a company is responsible for the strategy and is not obligated to engage in substantive talks with a serious bidder. This clear and equally consistent ruling of the Enterprise Section of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal brought an end to the discussion between the management and shareholders of AkzoNobel concerning the bid from PPG. The court once again proved to be a highly effective oasis of calm when emotions start running high.   The unsolicited bid from PPG for AkzoNobel has caused quite a stir in the Dutch corporate community. It has evoked reactions ranging from barbarians at the gate and panic in the polder to calls for new rules against the undesired sell-off of the Dutch business community. Experts and politicians have fallen over each other to come up with solutions to this pressing problem. Some of these are genuinely independent recommendations and others are presumably paid third-party endorsements. In short: these are confusing times.   At least one seasoned expert kept his cool amid the tumult: Huub Willems, former Chair of the Enterprise Chamber of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal. He expressed his misgivings in het Financieele Dagblad: ‘There is an assessment framework in place and everyone knows how it works. And that assessment framework is characterised by legal nuance and prevents shooting from the hip.’   Acquisitions take place in a private law atmosphere and Willems believes it should stay that way. ‘It would be extremely worrying if the government or a governmental body, for example the Netherlands Authority Financial Markets, were to start assessing the private business community in its entirety, as is the case in a state-controlled economy. I absolutely do not understand why, of all people, members of the business community seek these kinds of solutions.’   Acquisition processes are emotional rollercoasters. Board members feel their authority and position is under attack, employees are afraid of losing their jobs, trade unions are fearful for their members and shareholders want to see returns. One misplaced comment can spark upheaval. And that happens to be Anthony Burgmans’ trademark specialty. An unprecedentedly large number of big investors sided with Elliot in the case at the Enterprise Section of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal.   While the court crushed the shareholders’ demand to call a meeting with the only aim being to force Burgmans’ resignation also sent a clear message to the management of AkzoNobel: it cannot ignore shareholders’ incomprehension of its rejection of the bid. The Enterprise Chamber of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal is of the opinion that a continuing lack of confidence among a substantial proportion of the shareholders is damaging to the company and all its stakeholders. But they do not yet think it is their place to force AkzoNobel to provide a detailed explanation, but it must be provided nonetheless.   The Dutch system has worked and restored calm for the short term. But there is a greater danger looming in the longer term: international investors could start seeing the Netherlands as a place where shareholders have very little say when push comes to shove. The underlying nuance of the court’s message will not have escaped them.   It is up to the directors of Dutch companies to eliminate this potential resistance among investors through better communications and clear messages. The way in which the supervisory directors of AkzoNobel, ASM International, PostNL and TMG have recently done this can serve as an example of how not to do it.

Pagina's

Subscribe to Kees Jongsma